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Practice Name

My Pets Vet Clinic

Primary Location
12804 NE 85th Street #A
Kirkland, WA 98033
Phone: 425-889-0808
Fax: 425-822-6042

Office Hours

DayMorningAfternoon
Monday9am - 12:00pm1pm - 5pm
Tuesday9am - 12:00pm1pm - 5pm
Wednesday9am - 12:00pm1pm - 5pm
Thursday9am - 12:00pm1pm - 5pm
Friday9am - 12:00pm1pm - 5pm
Saturday8am2pm
SundayClosedClosed
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Welcome to My Pets Vet Clinic!


Veterinarian in Kirkland, WA

Also Serving Redmond, WA, and the Surrounding Areas

12804 NE 85th Street #A
Kirkland, WA 98033

425-889-0808

If you live in Kirkland or the surrounding area we would like the opportunity to become your family Veterinarian. Your pet's health and well being is our main concern and our goal is for you and your pet to receive quality care at affordable prices.

My Pets Vet Clinic services include wellness care, spay and neutering, vaccinations and both interstate and international health certificates as well as less urgent medical, surgical, and dental issues. We are a walk-in clinic, except for surgical and/or dental procedures and international health certificates, which require an appointment.

We have a number of resources for you to learn about how to take better care of your pets. Browse around and look at our articles and pet videos. The best veterinary care for animals is ongoing nutrition and problem prevention. If you want to ask a question call 425-889-0808 or email us and we'll promptly get back to you.  

You can find directions on how to get to our clinic on our Contact Us page. You can also subscribe to our newsletter which is created especially for our clients.  In between your veterinary visits, your pet will benefit from you reading these free informative articles.

Cold Weather Pet Safety

You’re probably already aware of the risks posed by warm weather and leaving pets in hot cars, but did you know that cold weather also poses serious threats to your pets’ health?
Here are some tips to keep your pets safe during cold weather:
Know the limits:  Just like people, pets’ cold tolerance can vary from pet to pet based on their coat, body fat stores, activity level, and health. Be aware of your pet’s tolerance for cold weather, and adjust accordingly. You will probably need to shorten your dog’s walks in very cold weather to protect you both from weather-associated health risks. Arthritic and elderly pets may have more difficulty walking on snow and ice and may be more prone to slipping and falling. Long-haired or thick-coated dogs tend to be more cold-tolerant, but are still at risk in cold weather. Short-haired pets feel the cold faster because they have less protection, and short-legged pets may become cold faster because their bellies and bodies are more likely to come into contact with snow-covered ground. Pets with diabetes, heart disease, kidney disease, or hormonal imbalances (such as Cushing’s disease) may have a harder time regulating their body temperature, and may be more susceptible to problems from temperature extremes. The same goes for very young and very old pets. If you need help determining your pet’s temperature limits, consult your veterinarian.
Stay inside. Cats and dogs should be kept inside during cold weather. It’s a common belief that dogs and cats are resistant than people to cold weather because of their fur, but it’s untrue. Like people, cats and dogs are susceptible to frostbite and hypothermia and should be kept inside. Longer-haired and thick-coated dog breeds, such as huskies and other dogs bred for colder climates, are more tolerant of cold weather; but no pet should be left outside for long periods of time in below-freezing weather.
Make some noise: A warm vehicle engine can be an appealing heat source for outdoor and feral cats, but it’s deadly. Check underneath your car, bang on the hood, and honk the horn before starting the engine to encourage feline hitchhikers to abandon their roost under the hood.
Check the paws: Check your dog’s paws frequently for signs of cold-weather injury or damage, such as cracked paw pads or bleeding. During a walk, a sudden lameness may be due to an injury or may be due to ice accumulation between his/her toes. You may be able to reduce the chance of iceball accumulation by clipping the hair between your dog’s toes.
Wipe down: During walks, your dog’s feet, legs and belly may pick up deicers, antifreeze, or other chemicals that could be toxic. When you get back inside, wipe down (or wash) your pet’s feet, legs and belly to remove these chemicals and reduce the risk that your dog will be poisoned after (s)he licks them off of his/her feet or fur. Consider using pet-safe deicers on your property to protect your pets and the others in your neighborhood.
Be prepared: Cold weather also brings the risks of severe winter weather, blizzards and power outages. Prepare a disaster/emergency kit, and include your pet in your plans. Have enough food, water and medicine (including any prescription medications as well as heartworm and flea/tick preventives) on hand to get through at least 5 days.


Employment Opportunities

We are currently seeking applicants for different positions. Feel free to apply.

View Employment Opportunities

Office Hours

DayMorningAfternoon
Monday9am - 12:00pm1pm - 5pm
Tuesday9am - 12:00pm1pm - 5pm
Wednesday9am - 12:00pm1pm - 5pm
Thursday9am - 12:00pm1pm - 5pm
Friday9am - 12:00pm1pm - 5pm
Saturday8am2pm
SundayClosedClosed

425-889-0808

Contact

My Pets Vet Clinic
12804 NE 85th Street #A
Kirkland, WA 98033
Get Directions
  • Phone: 425-889-0808
  • Fax: 425-822-6042
  • Email Us
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